Tartan Trilogy : The Journey

I was up early on January 27th 2012 – well before I needed to be.  Whenever I undertake a long journey I have a rigorous pre-travel routine, which has become more complicated since  Trudy’s arrival on the scene.  On this particular trip Trudy’s kit took up more suitcase space than mine!  (Probably my fault for packing more dog food than necessary in case we got stranded somewhere).  The motto “Just in case” unfortunately determines most of what I pack when I go away.

Sight-impaired people often find public transport a real headache.  Travelling by train in the UK has been made easier thanks to station stops being announced on the train’s PA system.  It is not very often nowadays that we have to resort to counting stops or checking the time to ascertain where we are on a train journey!  But the noisy, smelly and busy platforms, crowded trains and huge gaps in between the train and platform can be off-putting.  As for which platform to go to and which train to board, that’s another mountainous obstacle.  Booking Assisted Travel beforehand reduces the stress of an unfamiliar train journey, but nevertheless it is not easy to put your trust in a “system “.

http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/passenger_services/disabled_passengers/

Hereford Railway Station has the most expert staff when it comes to assisting passengers who need extra help.  Down to a T, they are faultless.  Even so, until I was a hundred per cent sure that I was on the right train to Crewe I could not relax.  As it was early the train was quiet and I found myself settling back very quickly.  Trudy’s agenda was to hoover up beneath the seats and wriggle as far away as she could on the lead.  After she had licked the floor and eaten all the stray crumbs, she grumbled and curled up in a big lump to catch up on some missed sleep.  Labradors have it so easy.

Crewe was where I needed to change in order to catch the train to Glasgow Central.  When I had Googled Crewe Station a few days earlier, I was dismayed to learn that the station had 12 platforms and several cafes.  In other words, it was BIG.  This meant that as the train approached Crewe I became steadily more anxious.  What if there was no staff member waiting to meet me and assist me with the connection?  What if I actually missed the connection and never got to Gourock?  Suddenly my whole  life seemed to hang on making this one train connection.  It became my ultimate goal, my springboard, my future.  Crewe Station was Rivendell, Mount Olympus, Utopia, Paradise.  I had to get there, and equally I had to leave.  The Quest was gigantic and seemingly impossible.

On arrival, I was met by an extremely cheerful young man who took charge of my suitcase and bad me follow.  Off I went into the nether regions of Crewe Station, Trudy hoovering in the lead, completely oblivious to where we were heading.  It paid to be trusting.  In a few minutes I was comfortably established in one of the cafes I’d read about, relieved that at least I would make it over the border to Glasgow.  The chirpy lad was unquestionably sure of his trains, and that meant that I was sure too.  Ironically, I actually informed a fellow passenger that this was the correct platform for Glasgow Central – such is the ebb and flow of public transport!

The second leg of the journey felt like the real start of my adventure.  For one thing, I am so used to Arriva Trains that sitting in a train which was owned by a different company felt decidedly unorthodox.  It was like being in a stranger’s house.  This train was very crowded, and Trudy received far more attention than she had done on the way to Crewe. 

I could feel the tip of her tail thumping against my foot as one by one, people described her as “marvellous” and “beautiful”.  Her ear flaps were pinned back against the side of her head as she licked the cream off the luscious compliments.  She was the picture of stoicism  – the perfect working dog, saintly, bordering on smug. 

So when she dived into an un-manned crisp packet and virtually devoured the contents before anyone could intervene, the food crime appeared all the more shocking and unthinkable.  I was expecting a Tabloid journalist to tap me on the shoulder and berate me for “creating” a thief.  I felt the shame of a disappointed parent.  The aisle was narrow and there were people jammed in every available space, so Trudy’s intention to finish off her ill-gotten gains was harder to contain.  I succeeded in retrieving the crisp packet, only to realise that my hand and sleeve were covered in slimy, half-chewed crisp remnants fresh from the mouth of a Labrador.  I pretended I was not with her.  I was disgusted.  Trudy was disgusted too, for she wanted the crisps.  The atmosphere was a tangible bubble of bad mood.

Then we reached Preston.  I remember Preston because the train suddenly became colder.  This was my first awareness of being “on holiday”.  It was snowing outside, and I began excitedly sending texts to friends and family relating that I was at Preston, and “guess what guys?  It’s snowing!”  The PA system decided to pack up here so I rapidly tried to recall how many stations lay in between Preston and Glasgow Central.  There was a swift change of guard, and the new one was Scottish –  so we truly were on the way to Glasgow!

Having survived Crewe, I was not overly anxious about Glasgow Central Station.  I’m very glad, for this station dwarfed Crewe by far.  It was like a micro-city, with swarms of passengers buzzing hither and thither.  Thankfully the Assisted Travel was still up to the mark, as otherwise I would have disappeared into the underworld and never emerged again.  In Glasgow Station I giggled like an over-excited kid – I was actually over the border, out of England, venturing into another country!  My ears tuned into Scottish voices, some of which I could barely comprehend.  I slid about in my own  Englishness, for it felt totally inadequate in this environment.  I so wanted to add a bit of Scot to my identity!

My third train was a relatively short journey from Glasgow Central to Gourock.  By sheer coincidence I found that I was sitting opposite someone who was destined for the Murder Mystery Weekend in Dunoon.  Trudy actually introduced us and hence made the discovery  – in return for which I forgave her earlier food crime.  The Snout has its uses. 

Thus I reached my destination of Gourock Railway Station nearly seven and a half hours after leaving Hereford.  The smoothness of the journey gave me untold confidence when it came to returning home three days later.  Ironically this time I did miss the connection at Crewe which delayed my return to Hereford by over an hour.  The event was almost an anti-climax and I smiled recalling the anxiety which had plagued me just a few days earlier.  I can even whisper to the world that I think I now feel confident travelling by train.  “If there’s a railway station,” I heard myself saying to someone a couple of days ago, “Trudy and I can get there”.

The second part of the Tartan Trilogy (in progress) will recount the Murder Mystery Weekend itself – tune in if you dare!

http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/passenger_services/disabled_passengers/

http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/supportus/campaigns/talkingbuses/talking-buses-news/guide-dogs-discovers-the-forgotten-passengers/

 

Retreat of The Black Dog

I have so much to write about in Clairetrude’s Corner.  Some people may be wondering whether I made it to Scotland, or indeed, if I have returned.

Well here I am, in my Hereford den, poised to relate my adventures.  But the black dog has sought to hound me yet again, and that is why my WordPress Tartan Trilogy is still wrapped in its box in my cerebral attic.

I have stolen the black dog metaphor from Winston Churchill because I cannot produce a better one.  The hound appears from nowhere, hungry for your soul, thirsty for your life-blood.  When you wake up and espy the beast lying at your bedside you cannot escape from him.  Loyal as any hound, he follows you wherever you go, and finds his way into the core of your being.  In many ways you become the black dog which is haunting you. 

Shortly after my return from Scotland I learned that my grandmother had died.  I thought that I was coping fairly well with my grief until the black dog bit my ankles and brought me down.  Once I was on the ground with his hot breath pumping into my face, I could not get up again. 

Over time I have learned that the black dog is not something to fight.  He is stronger than I am, and could kill me with one snap of his jaws.  Whenever I feel those iron jaws upon me, despite my instinct to fight him off I must reach out to caress and soothe him.  As my fingers plunge into his black fur I know that I have to accept this unwelcome visitor.  For an unspecified period I will be sharing my life with him – a semi-feral beast who would not be averse to eating me for dinner.  If I allow him to stay and treat him with wary respect, I have a better chance of staying alive.  For being no ordinary hound, eventually he will tire of me and wander away.  The black dog likes to wander. 

As I write, the black hound still lurks nearby but he appears to be retreating.  As soon as I feel some space between the beast and myself I crawl onto my knees and examine my wounds.  The bites have been severe this time, but they are not fatal. 

I know that as soon as I regain some inner-strength and optimism he will slide away into the shadows.  When I become master of myself, I am master of him also.

So the Tartan Trilogy may well appear fairly soon if the black dog continues his retreat.  But right now he is still skulking between me and my mental archives, and I do not wish to lose my fingers.